Saturday, 18 February 2017

Google Doodle!

Have to say I don't often like Google's doodles. Half the time I don't know the people they're commemorating or the event and the other half I don't like the doodle. I suppose they're trying to cover people and events globally so if I took the time to look into them it would be very educational. Nowadays I'm trying to clutter my brain up with remembering only the essentials. Just wish you could defrag your brain like you can with a computer!

I haven't been posting much recently as I don't have a computer that's any use for blogging. I'm stuck with a tablet at the moment which is more difficult to use. Howeverfound a draft of a post about this doodle when I was checking the Blog. 

I saw this one before Christmas liked it but didn't finish my post about it. It's commemorating the 105th anniversary of Roald Amundsen's successful expedition to reach the South Pole. After that the base served as short respite for the crew of Captain Scott’s expedition to the South Pole – a journey that they would sadly all die on during their return. 

It's a very clever doodle with its igloo shape but for me it looks like a snow globe. Maybe they meant it to!

Why not take a look.

4 comments:

  1. It's almost impossible to post from a tablet I think. Whenever I do it my side bar disappears and all the formatting is wrong. You'd think blogger would be able to sort that out really. I do like my iPad, but I think it's quite limiting,

    I like the doodle too!

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  2. I did not know about Google Doodles. Hooray! Happy to find. Love stories of discovery expeditions.

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    Replies
    1. Okay,now I am not going to get anything else done today. I am happy that while I have a tablet and a laptop, I still use my desk top computer to blog and so far (knock on wood) all is well.

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    2. Sorry! It can be addictive once you start looking.

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