Monday, 11 July 2016

Isola del Garda

I've been missing from blogging as I've been on my travels again. Starting with the Inner Hebrides early May, Rhodes mid May & then Venice, Milan, Verona & Lake Garda in June. It's taken me ages to catch up with work & housework but hopefully things are getting back to normal. Well as near as it ever gets to normal in our house. I'm not the tidiest of people!

The photo above is one I took on a boat as we were leaving one of the the islands in Lake Garda, Isola del Garda so that's why it's a bit skew whiff. I do love that house and it's wonderful Italian & English gardens. It's so peaceful there.


















The current house isn't that old really, but it's history goes a long way back. Cutting it short Gallic Roman tombstones were found on the island & around 1220 St Francis of Assisi built a simple hermitage there as he believed it was an ideal place for his monks. By 1797 Napoleon suppressed the monastery and later it became a state owned property.


By 1860 it had been given to the army and then it was sold to private owners. I won't go into the detail but the villa was built in Neo Gothic Venetian style and is currently owned by the Cavazza family who live there. They open the house to the public and rent it for occasions such as weddings in order to restore and maintain it. 

My favourite bit is the terrace. This is where we ended up having some nibbles. There were bits of bread to dip in the olive oil produced from the family's olive groves, local cheeses, olives, water, orange juice and a glass of delicious white wine. 


Just imagine having your breakfast or any meal up here. This is the terrace (I think they called it the loggia) looking up from the ground level.


The design is lovely.

The ceiling is wonderful too. However the guide explained that it wasn't painted in situ, it was taken from a building and placed there!


The views are fantastic.


Unfortunately the day we were visiting was a little hazy for taking photos of the lake, it was really hot too but up on the terrace it was shady and a little cooler.

These are some shots from the gardens. I had to keep on the move with the group and keep an eye on some elderly passengers so the photos were taken really quickly and are not the best! 
























Sadly the tour came to an end so quickly and we returned by boat to Desenzano, our base for the week there.

6 comments:

  1. The photos are great and interesting to read about the area and as I've said before or thought it but sure I've said it - I Envy your job! Lucky girl you are.

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  2. Thanks Sandy. I do enjoy it as I see some lovely places I would probably never see. My husband isn't keen on holidays by train but I love them, it's quite relaxing apart from carrying your luggage on & off. If I continue doing the tours I think I'll send my case on ahead despite the cost. Have to say it can be quite stressful if you get "problem" passengers and you can never keep everyone happy..

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    1. I imagine it would be stressful dealing with certain passengers ... But seeing all this beauty in the world ...i imagine looking back after you've come home from a trip is worth the hassle. Sometimes I travel by google maps and in my next life I want to be a world traveler with feet on the ground. I've never been out of the states but at least I have seen some pretty places. Oh yeah about that smog - we have it really bad here in So Cal at times - mainly during the summer. A lot of states with big cities have the problem also.

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  3. How wonderful that you have actually been there. I shall close my eyes at breakfast this morning and imagine that I am there too:-) Thanks for the images.

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  4. Thank you for the tour of this magnificent estate and gardens.
    I love visiting grand country houses like this one.
    You are very lucky to have the oportunity to travel so often.
    Tina x

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  5. You had me at the nibbles and white wine! Looks beautiful.

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